Now I get it

For the life of me I couldn’t figure out why people would spend their hot Augusts in the kitchen making tomato sauce.  Why not just can the tomatoes and make sauce this winter?  Well, after processing 36 lbs this morning into sauce in less than 2 hours I get it now.

Last year I bought 40 lbs of tomatoes and canned them in quarters.  It took about 6 or 8 hours to clean them, remove the skins, get them in the jars, canned and then downstairs.  Perhaps more time.

This morning I put 36 lbs of quartered tomatoes through the Victorio  and juiced them in less than two hours.  In fact, it is just now 2.5 hours since I started and I’ve already cleaned it all up.  The sauce is in the oven cooking down right now so that doesn’t really count as time spent canning.  Once the sauce is ready I’ll have to can them, but that doesn’t take a whole lot of time either.

So by juicing them and making sauce instead of canning the whole tomato I saved myself at least 4 hours, even with the canning still to come.

Now I get it.

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9 responses to “Now I get it

  1. I used to put my squashed tomatoes in the crockpot to cook down on high, lid slightly ajar.
    Kept the heat contained a bit more. I used a Foley Food Mill to squash my tomatoes so it was thicker than juice. Just a thought.

  2. When I make my sauce I don’t remove the skins, I simply puree the lot, skin & all, you would never know they had been left on, and there is so much goodness in those skins!

    Blessings:)

  3. Matt,

    Slightly off the topic, but how to you keep the tomatoes from getting blight? All of mine have it and are dying. 😦 I have also noticed that most of the poeple in my neighborhood have it. Any ideas? The only things I am finding so far on line are “plant disease resistant plants” and basically that there is nothing I can do to save my plants. I am very saddend by this.

  4. Tara–

    When I see yellowing leaves I usually snip them off at the stem and toss them. The thought being that this will get the fungus away from the plant before it can spread to other plants.

    I also try to make sure to water in the mornings so the leaves can dry through the day. I plant tomatoes that are good for my area from a local seed company, which helps. I also mulch the bases of the plants to moderate moisture and I put the tomatoes in heavily composted areas.

    I still get blight though. I think snipping off the leaves seems to be the most effective control.

  5. Molly-

    I’ve tried that puree technique and it wasn’t a huge hit here. I guess I like the sauce without the seeds. Thanks for the thought though.

  6. I do what Molly does, sort of. I quarter the tomatoes, cook just until tender, put them through the food processor and then, through a sieve, which takes out the seeds and any skins that would puree. Then, with some of the pulp still in the juice, I add all of my sauce spices or soup additions, and cook/can as directed.

    I completely agree with you – it really is faster and easier than trying to can them whole or in quarters, and when I get ready to use them, it’s just a matter of popping open a jar and heating, rather than popping open a jar, putting it through the food processor, cooking, adding seasoning …. There’s something to be said for “convenience foods”, eh?

    I’d like more info on how you bake your sauce? I always simmer mine in a pot on top of the stove, which requires watching and stirring to prevent burning.

  7. I use my food processor and a sieve after I’ve cooked my tomatoes to just tender. The food processor purees everything nicely, and the sieve takes out the seeds, which I don’t really care for, either, and using those tools is certainly much easier than spending hours skinning and deseeding tomatoes.

    I completely agree with you – it really is faster and easier than trying to can them whole or in quarters, and when I get ready to use them, it’s just a matter of popping open a jar and heating, rather than popping open a jar, putting it through the food processor, cooking, adding seasoning …. There’s something to be said for “convenience foods”, eh?

    I’d like more info on how you bake your sauce? I always simmer mine in a pot on top of the stove, which requires watching and stirring to prevent burning.

  8. Stick it in the oven at 350 or something. That’s it.

    It takes longer than using the stovetop but sometimes it’s useful. Like, I can put the sauce in the oven and go to bed and come back in the morning and it will be thickened. I’m going to try the crockpot too and see how that works out.

  9. Thanks Matt!

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